Cheese, herb and yoghurt scones

As a result of my membership of the UK Food Bloggers Association I found out that Total yoghurt were giving away a selection of their yoghurt in return for bloggers coming up with recipes that use yoghurt.  Having been a long-time fan of Total yoghurt I had to put my name forward for this one.  Sure enough a hefty delivery of yoghurt arrived, including the full-fat version, 2% and 0% fat, and even ones with corners of honey to drizzle straight into the waiting yoghurt pot.  My first foray into yoghurt cooking are these scones.  I have wanted to make soda scones (or indeed bread) with yoghurt instead of buttermilk for a while, so this was the perfect opportunity.  I had made minestrone soup and left it to simmer gently in the simmering oven of the Aga whilst I took the girls to the local play pit for an afternoon of racing around with their friends.  So, when we came in all I had to do was add the pasta, warm the soup bowls and make these scones to go with the soup.

They take very little time to make and are a delicious accompaniment to soup.  They were also good the next day, reheated and refreshed by a five-minute burst in the oven, and spread thickly with marmalade.

You could do almost endless variations of these; leaving them plain, or adding olives, chopped crispy bacon bits, chopped Peppadew peppers, your favourite herb or spice, or you could add currants and raisins for a fruity scone.

The addition of yoghurt made them more dense than I think they would have been had I used buttermilk (or milk with added lemon juice, if you don’t have any buttermilk, see my post on soda bread for an explanation) but I think in this case this was a bonus as it suited the minestrone soup perfectly.  You may not be quite so happy with your tea-time scone being this heavy, though.

I used half plain and half spelt flour as I love the nuttiness of the spelt, but you could use all plain flour for a lighter scone or use half plain and half wholemeal.  Feel free to experiment.

220g (8oz) plain flour
220g (8oz) spelt flour
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda (bread soda or baking soda)
1 tsp salt
½ tsp dried thyme
50g (2oz) grated cheese (I used Red Leicester)
500g Total yoghurt
100ml milk
juice of ½ lemon

Method

Mix the flours and salt in a bowl and sieve in the soda.  Sprinkle in the thyme and the cheese and mix well with your hand to get it all evenly mixed.

In a jug or bowl, mix the yoghurt, milk and lemon juice and then pour this into the flour mixture.  Mix with your hand until combined.  Place on to a floured surface and roll to a depth of about 2-3 cm.  Using an 8cm cutter cut out scones with one tap.  Don’t turn the cutter or the scones will fail to rise. Try to do this as quickly as possible as you need to get these in the oven whilst the soda is still doing its magic. Place onto a floured baking tray and bake in a preheated oven at 220°c (gas mark 8) (or on the floor of the roasting oven of the Aga)  for 15-20 minutes until golden brown.   Allow to cool for five minutes, but they are best served warm, with lashings of good butter.

Advertisements

9 responses to “Cheese, herb and yoghurt scones

  1. These look a lot lighter than the scones I make, but that’s probably because I generally don’t mix mine with any white flour. I think I might have to get a bit less fixed in my ideas as I don’t really like my scones that much so consequently don’t make them. But I love scones – oh the dilemma!

    Was thinking about going for the yogurt, but wasn’t sure if I could cope with having to make loads of yogurty things in a fairly short timescale. Anyway, these look and sound lovely.

    • Thank you, I would say that looking at your recent blog posts you don’t need to have a dilemma, just go for a walk and stop by for someone else’s scones – let them do the work and you reap the enjoyment. But I bet your scones are lovely anyway.

  2. Pingback: Buckwheat pancakes « The Ordinary Cook

  3. These are wonderful scones and the yogurt must have made them really light. Greek Yogurt is always in the fridge here. They seem to have been extremely generous with the amount they sent you – Greek Yogurt heaven.

  4. Kath, good point – I’ll stop trying to make my own duds and just go out for more cream teas – ohh my tummy!

  5. Pingback: Cucumber and cumin dip « The Ordinary Cook

  6. Kath, Just made a batch of these for an Easter tea – they were so good. But also really light, so not sure where the difference was. I used the 0% fat yogurt and I did use baking powder as well as the bicarb, so maybe that was it. I also used fresh lemon thyme from the garden which was good. Anyway, they were very popular so thank you for the recipe.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s